Two new Publications

Psychotherapy 2.0: Where Psychotherapy and Technology Meet

Psychotherapy 2.0: Where Psychotherapy and Technology Meet

Editor : Philippa Weitz

I wrote a commentary in chapter eight of this very timely book.

Synopsis from the Karnac website:

The digital age is both exciting and challenging for psychotherapy, opening the door to clients groups previously not able to access psychological help, whilst also providing the challenges caused by social media and internet abuse and how these impact on the consulting room.

Psychotherapy 2.0 blows open the consulting room doors and shows successful pathways for attracting new clients to gain access to psychological help, as well as demonstrating that despite initial scepticism, working online as a psychotherapist or counsellor can be as effective as ‘face2face’ work: the therapeutic relationship may be different but it remains the centrally important feature for successful psychotherapy. It follows therefore that all psychotherapists and counsellors need to be fully informed about the impact of the digital age on their clinical practice. Psychotherapy 2.0 covers the key issues for psychotherapists and counsellors who are, or are thinking of, working online, include thinking about psychotherapy in the digital age, the requirements to modify training both for working online and also the digital issues as they arise within the face2face consulting room.

This book is intended as a first volume in this fast changing field, with further volumes intended to concentrate on existing and emerging research, as well the diverse ways in which online work is already being developed and implemented worldwide. It is possibly the greatest moment of change for psychotherapy since Freud: there is no going back, and just as we cannot put toothpaste back in the tube, psychotherapy practice is changed for ever with the advent of the digital age.

Reference

Van Rijn, B. (2014). Establishing an Online Practice. Chapter Eight Commentary. Psychotherapy 2.0: Where Psychotherapy and Technology Meet  Ed. P. Weitz. London, Karnac Books: 186-187.

 

Challenges to Developing Routine Outcomes Evaluation in Different Practice Settings and Cultures: A Naturalistic Enquiry in Spain and the UK

Abstract

A naturalistic sessional evaluation of routine outcomes of psychotherapy from a range of theoretical orientations including transactional analysis, using standardised measures for depression, anxiety, general distress and working alliance, was conducted across completed therapy interventions by 113 therapists with 263 clients within an academic institution in the UK and across stages of therapy by 10 therapists with 26 clients in three independent clinics in Spain.  Outcomes in both countries demonstrated clinical gains but it was found that such evaluation methodology was more easily applied within a training institute than in private practice; it also appeared to better fit the UK professional climate of evaluation.  Suggestions are made concerning the introduction of such research in future.

Reference

van Rijn, B., Wild, C., & Dumitru, A. (2014). Challenges to Developing Routine Outcomes Evaluation in Different Practice Settings and Cultures: A Naturalistic Enquiry in Spain and the UK. International Journal of Transactional Analysis Research, 5(2), 28-34. Retrieved from http://www.ijtar.org/article/view/13800/9077

Published in TA Journal: Humanistic and Integrative Therapies for Anxiety and Depression

Biljana van Rijn, Ciara Wild (2013) Humanistic and Integrative Therapies for Anxiety and Depression:
Practice-Based Evaluation of Transactional Analysis, Gestalt, and Integrative Psychotherapies and Person-Centered Counseling

Abstract

The research described in this article involved a naturalistic, nonrandomized evaluation of transactional analysis and gestalt psychotherapies, integrative counseling psychology, and person-centered counseling within a medium-term, community-based service. Routine outcome evaluation used standardized measures to assess treatment outcomes and the working alliance. Adherence to the model was evaluated in clinical supervision. The outcomes showed that clients who engaged in treatment made statistically significant improvements and that transactional analysis and gestalt psychotherapies, integrative counseling psychology, and person-centered counseling can be used effectively in treatment of anxiety and depression within a community setting. Clients had a choice about the duration of therapy and used different numbers of sessions within the framework of the service. They were also able to change therapists. Both choices had clinical implications in terms of attrition and outcomes and require further research.

doi: 10.1177/0362153713499545 Transactional Analysis Journal April 2013 vol. 43 no. 2 150-163

Presentation at the 19th BACP Research Conference, May 2013

19th Annual BACP Research Conference, 10 & 11 May 2013;
Conference title ‘Synergy in counselling & psychotherapy research’

Presenter: Dr Biljana van Rijn and other author: Ciara Wild

ABSTRACT: Research Clinic: Routine Outcome Evaluation of Humanistic and Integrative Therapy

Keywords (give 5): research clinic, Humanistic and Integrative psychotherapy/counselling; routine outcome evaluation

Aim/Purpose:

The research was a naturalistic, non randomised, evaluation of Transactional Analysis (TA) and Gestalt psychotherapies, Integrative Counselling Psychology and Person Centred counselling within a community based service. Routine outcome evaluation used standardised measures to assess treatment outcomes and working alliance. Adherence to the model was evaluated in clinical supervision. The outcomes showed that clients who engaged in treatment made statistically significant improvements and that Transactional Analysis and Gestalt psychotherapies, Integrative Counselling psychology and Person Centred counselling can be used effectively in treatment of anxiety and depression within a community setting. Clients had a choice about the duration of therapy and used different numbers of sessions within the framework of the service. The presentation will offer a reflection on how a choice of therapist and a length of therapy impacted on outcomes.

To evaluate the outcomes of humanistic and integrative psychotherapies (Transactional Analysis, Gestalt, Integrative Counselling Psychology) and Person Centred counselling in routine practice by:

  • Evaluating whether these therapies achieved a  significant reduction in scores on  standardises measures
  • Comparing the effectiveness of different theoretical orientations

Design/Methodology:

The project was a naturalistic, non-randomised, evaluation of routine outcomes of Transactional Analysis and Gestalt psychotherapies, Integrative Counselling Psychology and Gestalt and Person Centred counselling. Differences between the approaches have not been evaluated due to the sample size.

Therapy was evaluated using sessional standardised measures  (GAD7;PHQ9;Core 10), pre and post measures (BDI-II;CORE 34). Adherence to the theoretical model was evaluated using Adherence questionnaires.

Results/Findings:

67 herapists and 321 clients took part in the evaluation. There was a high percentage of completed data sets (over 90% for sessional measures). The outcomes show that:

  • Clients who continued in therapy after the assessment period, achieved a significant improvement and large effect size on sessional measures for depression, anxiety and general outcomes measured by CORE 10.
  • There were no differences in effectiveness between theoretical orientations

Additional Analysis:

  • Analysis of the high level of attrition and requests to change therapists during the assessment period. It showed that once the clients changed therapists they achieved the same levels of change as those who made a good working relationship with their initial therapist.
  • Length of therapy. The number of sessions varied between individual clients, but was not directly related to the outcomes.

Research Limitations relevant to naturalistic research:

  • No randomisation
  • No control group
  • Limited monitoring of  therapist techniques in sessions
  • Evaluation of therapies in routine practice, rather than efficacy.

Conclusions:

  • Humanistic (Transactional Analysis; Gestalt Psychotherapy; Person Centred Counselling) and Integrative therapies achieved a significant improvement in anxiety, depression and general wellbeing in routine practice, within a community setting.
  • There was no difference in effectiveness between these approaches
  • Length of therapy varied but a number of sessions was not directly linked to outcomes
  • A large proportion of clients stop therapy prematurely within a community setting. Offering a different therapist to those clients enabled them to engage in therapy and gain from it.

 

2nd EATA TA Research Conference

Details about this conference can be found at: www.taresearch.org
Upcomming conferences: www.eatanews.org

Paper presentation: Research Clinic, Development, Outcomes and Challenges

Description
The paper will present a year (2010-2011) in the research clinic at Metanoia Institute. This was a naturalistic evaluative study using quantitative, standardised methods of evaluation within a low cost training clinic. Outcomes of evaluation of TA psychotherapy, alongside Integrative Counselling Psychology, Gestalt psychotherapy and Person Centred counselling will be presented and discussed. The presentation will end with recommendations for future research and learning about the development of research clinics.
About the Presenter(s)
Biljana van Rijn is a Head of Clinical and Research Services at Metanoia Institute in London, where she has developed a research clinic and conducts practice based evaluative research projects. She teaches on the MSc programme in Transactional Analysis Psychotherapy and the Doctorate in Counselling Psychology at Metanoia Institute and offers research supervision. Biljana also works as a psychotherapist and supervisor in private practice in West Sussex.
Outcomes for delegates:
Knowledge about current research on effectiveness of Transactional Analysis Psychotherapy.
Understanding of the gains and challenges of evaluation in practice settings.

Article in Script Magazine (ITAA)

From: Script Magazine VOL. 42, NO. 4  APRIL 2012

Evaluation in Psychotherapy: An Opportunity and a Challenge

by Biljana van Rijn

Standardized evaluation and the development of clinical guidelines for psychotherapy have had a significant impact on services in the United Kingdom. Health organizations are funding short-term, evidence-based treatments, primarily cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Other evidence-based treatments (e.g., psychoanalytic psychotherapy and person-centered counseling) continue to be recognized. Humanistic and integrative approaches such as transactional analysis are challenged to provide the research evidence base for their work or become marginalized. click here to read more